How to keep the ‘Boris Babis’ statue in the background of your game

An important piece of the footballing landscape is being taken off the pitch. 

But the same cannot be said of the statue of the late Russian billionaire Boris Babis, which is currently being used to symbolise the Russian national team.

The statue was unveiled in March as part of the first-ever Russian World Cup exhibition in London and has been in the grounds since March 2012.

It has become a key part of Russian football’s heritage, and has inspired both the country’s football team and the Russian state.

A similar statue of Babis was installed in Berlin as part, in 2011, of a similar exhibition.

It is also being used by fans and other visitors to the Russian capital as part the official celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Babis Law in 2014.

This week, the Russian Football Federation (RFU) decided to replace the statue, which was created by former World War II commander Vadim Babis.

In March 2016, the Ukrainian government, which took over power from Babis in 2018, passed the BIS-approved legislation that banned any Russian public institution from performing any “propaganda or art work” in support of the “Russian state”.”

The project was completed in 2016, and the decision was taken that it be removed as soon as possible, following the decision by the European Court of Human Rights.”

In March 2016, the Ukrainian government, which took over power from Babis in 2018, passed the BIS-approved legislation that banned any Russian public institution from performing any “propaganda or art work” in support of the “Russian state”.

The decision has since been challenged in court, with the Ukrainian authorities seeking to block the statue from being moved, and to force the RFUs to pay compensation to Babis supporters.

Babis died in a plane crash in February 2019.

The RFU has been unable to find any other suitable location for the statue in Russia, although the RFV does have other plans to move it.

However, it will be removed from the ground by the end of the month, and will not be re-installed until 2020.

“It is very important that the statue is not vandalised,” the RFF said.